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37 results for "minimalist art"
Abstracts: minimalist scribblings By Skip Ploss
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In his latest book, author/illustrator Skip Ploss ("If Picasso Were a Fish" and "If I Had a Gift") shows children of all ages that you don't always have to draw a whole picture... More > for the audience to get the picture. The text is an abstraction itself as a semi-repeating form of Haiiku. This book was chosen by the Austin Museum of Art to support thier exhibiltion of art by Sol LeWitt entitled "LeWitt x 2". "Abstracts: Minimalist Scribblings shows children of all ages how simple lines can illustrate intriguing ideas. What a gem of a book!” Anna Kichorowsky Manager of Family & Community Programs Austin Museum of Art-Downtown< Less
Minimalist Coloring Book By Craig Conley
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The Absence of Coloring Contains All Coloring. —Zen Koan This coloring book contains images of white things, printed on white paper. Is one to fill in these images with a white crayon? Or is... More > one to let go of the crayon and practice the Taoist concept of wu-wei (actionless action)? Why color white objects white? • White is the absence of color which contains all colors. • It's easy to keep within the lines. • It helps one to focus on process, not results. • It fulfills Zen Master Han-Shan's invitation to "leap the world's ties and sit among the white clouds." • It is a rejection of artifice, an unveiling of the void. • It is an antidote to art theory.< Less
Minimalist Coloring Book By Craig Conley
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The Absence of Coloring Contains All Coloring. —Zen Koan This coloring book contains images of white things, printed on white paper. Is one to fill in these images with a white crayon? Or is... More > one to let go of the crayon and practice the Taoist concept of wu-wei (actionless action)? Why color white objects white? • White is the absence of color which contains all colors. • It's easy to keep within the lines. • It helps one to focus on process, not results. • It fulfills Zen Master Han-Shan's invitation to "leap the world's ties and sit among the white clouds." • It is a rejection of artifice, an unveiling of the void. • It is an antidote to art theory.< Less
Abstracts 2: more minimalist scribblings By Skip Ploss
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In this, his fourth book for children of all ages, author and illustrator Skip Ploss offers another batch of abstract picture and haiiku pairs for young folks to explore.
The Topology of Objecthood in Contemporary Art By Rebecca Taylor Duclos
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Forty years after the writing of “Art and Objecthood,” this thesis presents an alternative idea of objecthood that moves from Michael Fried’s original association of the concept... More > with the objects of literalist (minimalist) art to an idea of objecthood as a field (of both vision and action).< Less
The Topology of Objecthood in Contemporary Art By Rebecca Taylor Duclos
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Forty years after the writing of “Art and Objecthood,” this thesis presents an alternative idea of objecthood that moves from Michael Fried’s original association of the concept... More > with the objects of literalist (minimalist) art to an idea of objecthood as a field (of both vision and action).< Less
2010 Art Calendar By Kristen Stein
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2010 Fine Art Calendar by Philadelphia Contemporary Artist Kristen Stein. Images include moody atmospheric minimalist landscapes, rustic tree landscapes and whimsical contemporary gardens. Each month... More > is highlighted with a beautiful image that is suitable for framing once the month is complete. To see more work by this artist, please visit http://www.StudioArtworks.com.< Less
As the Butterfly Said to Chuang Tzu By Michael Zheng
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This is the exhibition catalogue for the solo show of Michael Zheng of the same title at the Mission 17 gallery in San Francisco, 2006. The show set out to let viewers question the nature of... More > perception in light of phenomenological, cultural and political conditioning. It deliberately blurs the boundary between the art object and its context, questioning where the frame stops and where the art starts. This catalogue includes an essay by Clark Buckner on art after Conceptualism, as well as the three reviews of this show in Sculpture Magazine, Artweek and the Shotgun Review by Terri Cohn, Colin Berry and Scott Oliver respectively.< Less
As the Butterfly Said to Chuang Tzu By Michael Zheng
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This is the exhibition catalogue for the solo show of Michael Zheng of the same title at the Mission 17 gallery in San Francisco, 2006. The show set out to let viewers question the nature of... More > perception in light of phenomenological, cultural and political conditioning. It deliberately blurs the boundary between the art object and its context, questioning where the frame stops and where the art starts. This catalogue includes an essay by Clark Buckner on art after Conceptualism, as well as the three reviews of this show in Sculpture Magazine, Artweek and the Shotgun Review by Terri Cohn, Colin Berry and Scott Oliver respectively.< Less
idesignsetter @ Minimalism By Dilys Torosian
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Term used in the 20th century, in particular from the 1960s, to describe a style characterized by an impersonal austerity, plain geometric configurations and industrially processed materials. It was... More > first used by David Burlyuk in the catalogue introduction for an exhibition of John Graham’s paintings at the Dudensing Gallery in New York in 1929. Burlyuk wrote: ‘Minimalism derives its name from the minimum of operating means. Minimalist painting is purely realistic—the subject being the painting itself.’ The term gained currency in the 1960s. Accounts and explanations of Minimalism varied considerably, as did the range of work to which it was related. This included the monochrome paintings of Yves Klein, Robert Rauschenberg, Ad Reinhardt, Frank Stella and Brice Marden, and even aspects of Pop art and Post-painterly Abstraction. Typically the precedents cited were Marcel Duchamp’s ready-mades, the Suprematist compositions of Kazimir Malevich and Barnett Newman’s Abstract Expressionist paintings.< Less