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32 results for "nineteenth century farming"
Solace Farm By Coral Dey Andrade
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When Rose Dorance sailed across the Atlantic Ocean from America to England to visit a place called Solace Farm the last thing she ever expected to happen was to fall in love. In the nineteenth... More > century visiting a spa was not a normal practice, but Rose would soon discover that the impropriates of getting a massage or steaming in a sauna would be the least of her problems.< Less
Solace Farm By Coral Dey Andrade
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When Rose Dorance sailed across the Atlantic Ocean from America to England to visit a place called Solace Farm the last thing she ever expected to happen was to fall in love. In the nineteenth... More > century visiting a spa was not a normal practice, but Rose would soon discover that the impropriates of getting a massage or steaming in a sauna would be the least of her problems.< Less
Privy on the Porch & Pigs in the Cellar Part One By Martha DeWolf
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Using the diaries, journals and correspondence of an ordinary, nineteenth century, rural farm family from Massachusetts; Privy on the Porch & Pigs in the Cellar is fully annotated with the 21st... More > century reader in mind. Part One - 1800-1829< Less
Privy on the Porch & Pigs in the Cellar Part Two By Martha DeWolf
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In the early part of the nineteenth century, nothing much moved faster than the old horse could trot through the village. For generations, the family had measured the days by the passing seasons and... More > the years by the size of the harvest but the pace of life in rural New England had begun to accelerate. Even the concept of time was changing; what had been measured by the sun and the seasons would, during the nineteenth century, come to be measured by the factory bell and later, by the arrival or departure of a train. Part Two - 1830-1839< Less
Privy on the Porch & Pigs in the Cellar Part Four By Martha DeWolf
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In 1850, the Bullard’s farm in Holliston belonged jointly to Henry and his younger brother John Anson; called Anson to distinguish him from a half-dozen or more other John Bullards inhabiting... More > the area then. At mid-century, Henry and and his wife Bethia had four children under the age of eleven and a busy household which included “old people, children, menservants, women-servants, and frequent guests”. Prior to the coming of the railroad to Holliston it had taken Henry seven hours by wagon (in good weather) to reach Quincy Market, twenty-five miles away in Boston. He often left Holliston late, the night before, in order to reach the market early in the morning. During the 1840's Henry and his brother Anson had foreseen the market advantages the railroad would bring and Henry had expanded the farm orchard, expanded the livestock and dairy herds and the brothers had invested heavily in the railroads and real estate. By mid-century, Henry began to consider life as a gentleman farmer.< Less
Shamrock and White Rose By Joseph White
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Forced by famine and the political climate to leave Ireland at the age of 14 and seek a new life in the industrial north of England, this is the true story of Michael Maloney. He vividly describes... More > all that he experienced living amongst the poorest slums of Leeds in Yorkshire and working in the grime of the steelworks of that City. At other times he portrays the very different life on the farms near Ripon. He tells of the hostility and brutality encountered by Irish emigrants of the early eighteenth Century. A real life picture is drawn of the stark poverty and deprivation which was the lot of the poor of that generation. The narrative was written by Joseph White based on the life of his father which he had graphically described to him. Almost two centuries have passed since this tale was told and the unbelievable misery and poverty have passed with them. The story is not without humour and tribute is paid to those who extended a hand of friendship to the strangers in their midst.< Less
Shamrock and White Rose By Joseph White
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Forced by famine and the political climate to leave Ireland at the age of 14 and seek a new life in the industrial north of England, this is the true story of Michael Maloney. He vividly describes... More > all that he experienced living amongst the poorest slums of Leeds in Yorkshire and working in the grime of the steelworks of that City. At other times he portrays the very different life on the farms near Ripon. He tells of the hostility and brutality encountered by Irish emigrants of the early eighteenth Century. A real life picture is drawn of the stark poverty and deprivation which was the lot of the poor of that generation. The narrative was written by Joseph White based on the life of his father which he had graphically described to him. Almost two centuries have passed since this tale was told and the unbelievable misery and poverty have passed with them. The story is not without humour and tribute is paid to those who extended a hand of friendship to the strangers in their midst.< Less
Privy on the Porch & Pigs in the Cellar Part One By Martha DeWolf
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Much has been written about nineteenth century presidents, artists and adventurers. Thin and few are the threads that remain to deepen our appreciation of ordinary 19th century home life in rural New... More > England. The story of Henry and Bethia Wheeler Bullard, who farmed and raised a family in Holliston, Massachusetts during the nineteenth century can enlarge and enrich that understanding. Henry and Bethia Bullard were born just after the end of the War of 1812, during a decade that saw canals and roads started, mills built and the pulpit tormented by too many opinions. Teenagers in the 1830’s, during the 1840’s, Henry and Bethia married and started a family and moved back to the Bullard family farm in Holliston. The Bullard family was not famous. They were not celebrated citizens but rather, by the nineteenth century, an ordinary, solidly middle-class, upwardly-mobile farming family, related by marriage to the fringes of famous lives. Part One encompasses the years 1800-1829.< Less
Privy on the Porch & Pigs in the Cellar Part Two By Martha DeWolf
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In the early part of the nineteenth century, nothing much moved faster than the old horse could trot through the village. For generations, the family had measured the days by the passing seasons and... More > the years by the size of the harvest but the pace of life in rural New England had begun to accelerate. Even the concept of time was changing; what had been measured by the sun and the seasons would, during the nineteenth century, come to be measured by the factory bell and later, by the arrival or departure of a train. Part Two - 1830-1839.< Less
Privy on the Porch & Pigs in the Cellar Part Four By Martha DeWolf
eBook (ePub): $2.49
Download immediately.
In 1850, the Bullard’s farm in Holliston belonged jointly to Henry and his younger brother John Anson; called Anson to distinguish him from a half-dozen or more other John Bullards inhabiting... More > the area then. At mid-century, Henry and and his wife Bethia had four children under the age of eleven and a busy household which included “old people, children, menservants, women-servants, and frequent guests”. Prior to the coming of the railroad to Holliston it had taken Henry seven hours by wagon (in good weather) to reach Quincy Market, twenty-five miles away in Boston. He often left Holliston late, the night before, in order to reach the market early in the morning. During the 1840's Henry and his brother Anson had foreseen the market advantages the railroad would bring and Henry had expanded the farm orchard, expanded the livestock and dairy herds and the brothers had invested heavily in the railroads and real estate. By mid-century, Henry began to consider life as a gentleman farmer.< Less