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71 results for "pilot error"
Air Crash Investigations - Deadly Mistakes - The Crash of China Air Flight 129 By George Cramoisi, Editor
eBook (ePub): $9.99
On April 15, 2002, Air China flight 129, a Boeing 767-200ER, operated by Air China, en route from Beijing, China to Busan, Korea, crashed on Mt. Dotdae, near Gimhae Airport, Busan. Of the 166 persons... More > on board, 37 persons survived the crash, while 129 occupants were killed. The Korean Aviation Accident Investigation Board (KAAIB) determined that the probable cause of the crash was pilot error due to poor crew resource management and lost situational awareness during the circling approach of the runway. The Chinese investigation team pointed out that the Korean ATC was not fully licensed and mistakenly directed the airliner to descend to a wrong altitude and that the airport did not inform the crew of the weather conditions at the time. A contributing factor was that the airline made all announcements in Chinese and English, while most passengers were Korean.< Less
AIR CRASH INVESTIGATIONS: DEADLY MISTAKES The Crash of Air China Flight 129 By George Cramoisi, editor
Paperback: $29.99
Prints in 3-5 business days
On April 15, 2002, Air China flight 129, a Boeing 767-200ER, operated by Air China, en route from Beijing, China to Busan, Korea, crashed on Mt. Dotdae, near Gimhae Airport, Busan. Of the 166 persons... More > on board, 37 persons survived the crash, while 129 occupants were killed. The Korean Aviation Accident Investigation Board (KAAIB) determined that the probable cause of the crash was pilot error due to poor crew resource management and lost situational awareness during the circling approach of the runway. The Chinese investigation team pointed out that the Korean ATC was not fully licensed and mistakenly directed the airliner to descend to a wrong altitude and that the airport did not inform the crew of the weather conditions at the time. A contributing factor was that the airline made all announcements in Chinese and English, while most passengers were Korean.< Less
AIR CRASH INVESTIGATIONS: HORROR IN GUAM, The Crash of Korean Air Flight 801 By Igor Korovin
Paperback: $19.39
Prints in 3-5 business days
On August 6, 1997, about 0142:26 Guam local time, Korean Air flight 801, a Boeing 747-300, crashed at Nimitz Hill, Guam. The aircraft was on its way from Seoul, Korea to Guam with 237 passengers and... More > a crew of 17 on board. Of the 254 persons on board, 228 were killed. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces and a post-crash fire. The National Transportation Safety Board determined that the probable cause of the accident was captain’s fatigue and Korean Air’s inadequate flight crew training.< Less
AIR CRASH INVESTIGATIONS: HORROR IN GUAM, The Crash of Korean Air Flight 801 By Igor Korovin
eBook (PDF): $20.24
On August 6, 1997, about 0142:26 Guam local time, Korean Air flight 801, a Boeing 747-300, crashed at Nimitz Hill, Guam. The aircraft was on its way from Seoul, Korea to Guam with 237 passengers and... More > a crew of 17 on board. Of the 254 persons on board, 228 were killed. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces and a post-crash fire. The National Transportation Safety Board determined that the probable cause of the accident was captain’s fatigue and Korean Air’s inadequate flight crew training.< Less
Air Crash Investigations: The Crash Of Comair Flight 5191- How Comair Flight 5191, a Bombardier Cl-600-2819, Took Off from the Wrong Runway of Blue Grass Airport, Lexington Kentucky, and crashed, Killing 49 Passengers and Crewmembers By George Cramoisi
eBook (ePub): $9.33
On August 27, 2006, Comair Flight 5191, a Bombardier CL-600-2B19, crashed during takeoff from the wrong runway of Blue Grass Airport, Lexington, Kentucky, killing 49 of the 50 people aboard. From the... More > beginning everything went wrong. First the captain and first officer boarded the wrong airplane, only after starting the auxiliary power unit they found out they were in the wrong aircraft. Taxiing to the takeoff position the captain and first officer were so engaged in a private conversation that they did not realize they took the wrong runway. The air traffic controller did not notice anything.< Less
AIR CRASH INVESTIGATIONS FAILING BRAKES The Crash of TAM Linhas Aereas Flight JJ3054 By Hans Griffioen, editor
Paperback: $23.99
Prints in 3-5 business days
On 17 July 2007, at 17:19 local time, an Airbus A-320, operated as flight JJ3054 by TAM Linhas Aéreas, was on its way from Porto Alegre, Brazil, for a domestic flight to Congonhas Airport in... More > São Paulo city, São Paulo State, Brazil. During the landing, at 18:54 local time, the aircraft veered to the left, overran the left edge of the runway, collided with a building, and with a fuel service station. All persons on board – six crewmembers, and 181 passengers – perished. The crash also caused 12 fatalities on the ground. The runway had recently been resurfaced, but it did not yet have water-channeling grooves cut into it to reduce the danger of hydroplaning, making landing during rain a dangerous endeavour. Flight Data Recorder information showed that immediately prior to touchdown, both thrust levers were in CL (or "climb") position, with engine power being governed by the flight computer's autothrottle system.< Less
Air Crash Investigations - Failing Brakes - The Crash of TAM Linhas Aereas Flight 3054 By Hans Griffioen, Editor
eBook (ePub): $9.99
On 17 July 2007, at 17:19 local time, an Airbus A-320, operated as flight JJ3054 by TAM Linhas Aéreas, was on its way from Porto Alegre, Brazil, for a domestic flight to Congonhas Airport in... More > São Paulo city, São Paulo State, Brazil. During the landing, at 18:54 local time, the aircraft veered to the left, overran the left edge of the runway, collided with a building, and with a fuel service station. All persons on board – six crewmembers, and 181 passengers – perished. The crash also caused 12 fatalities on the ground. The runway had recently been resurfaced, but it did not yet have water-channeling grooves cut into it to reduce the danger of hydroplaning, making landing during rain a dangerous endeavour. Flight Data Recorder information showed that immediately prior to touchdown, both thrust levers were in CL (or "climb") position, with engine power being governed by the flight computer's autothrottle system.< Less
AIR CRASH INVESTIGATIONS: The Crash of Comair Flight 5191 By George Cramoisi
Paperback: $16.08
Prints in 3-5 business days
On August 27, 2006, Comair Flight 5191, a Bombardier CL-600-2B19, crashed during takeoff from the wrong runway of Blue Grass Airport, Lexington, Kentucky, killing 49 of the 50 people aboard. From the... More > beginning everything went wrong. First the captain and first officer boarded the wrong airplane, only after starting the auxiliary power unit they found out they were in the wrong aircraft. Taxiing to the takeoff position the captain and first officer were so engaged in a private conversation that they did not realize they took the wrong runway. The air traffic controller did not notice anything.< Less
The Crash of Comair 5191 By George Cramoisi
Paperback: $16.08
Prints in 3-5 business days
On August 27, 2006, Comair Flight 5191, a Bombardier CL-600-2B19, crashed during takeoff from the wrong runway of Blue Grass Airport, Lexington, Kentucky, killing 49 of the 50 people aboard. From the... More > beginning everything went wrong. First the captain and first officer boarded the wrong airplane, only after starting the auxiliary power unit they found out they were in the wrong aircraft. Taxiing to the takeoff position the captain and first officer were so deeply engaged in a private conversation that they did not realize they took the wrong runway. The air traffic controller did not notice anything.< Less
The Crash of Comair 5191: Air Crash Investigations By George Cramoisi
eBook (ePub): $9.04
On August 27, 2006, Comair Flight 5191, a Bombardier CL-600-2B19, crashed during takeoff from the wrong runway of Blue Grass Airport, Lexington, Kentucky, killing 49 of the 50 people aboard. From the... More > beginning everything went wrong. First the captain and first officer boarded the wrong airplane, only after starting the auxiliary power unit they found out they were in the wrong aircraft. Taxiing to the takeoff position the captain and first officer were so deeply engaged in a private conversation that they did not realize they took the wrong runway. The air traffic controller did not notice anything.< Less

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