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Birds and Birding in Wyoming’s Bighorn Mountains Region By Paul A. Johnsgard, Jacqueline L. Canterbury, Helen F. Downing
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This book is an authorized updated and expanded edition of Helen Downing’s Birds of North-Central Wyoming and the Bighorn National Forest (1990). The Bighorn Mountains in Wyoming are more than... More > 100 miles in length with a maximum elevation of 13,167 feet. Flanked to the west by the Bighorn River basin and to the east by the Powder River basin, they have produced a wide variation of vegetation types and ecosystems, including native grasslands and coniferous forest. At least 327 bird species have been reported from the region, and breeding has been confirmed for 190 species. Species descriptions indicate relative abundance, breeding status by latilong, and locality/date records. Regional birding areas are described and mapped, and results of recent regional breeding bird surveys and seasonal bird counts are summarized. Line drawings illustrate representatives of each of the 53 avian families documented for the region, and there are 7 maps and more than 60 literature citations.< Less
Birds of the Central Platte River Valley and Adjacent Counties By Paul A. Johnsgard, Mary Bomberger Brown
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The central Platte River Valley region of Nebraska encompasses 11 counties and nearly 10,000 square miles, and extends about 120 miles from the western edge of Lincoln County to the eastern edge of... More > Merrick County. At its center is the Platte River, the historic spring staging area for Sandhill and Whooping cranes, five species of geese, and millions of waterfowl and water-dependent birds. Collectively, at least 373 bird species have been reported from the Central Platte Valley, making it the most species-rich bird location in Nebraska, and of the most species-diverse regions in the Great Plains. The abundance, distribution and habitats of these species are summarized, with special consideration given to the Valley’s three nationally threatened and endangered birds, the Whooping Crane, Interior Least Tern, and Piping Plover, and the now probably extinct Eskimo Curlew. Also included are a species checklist, a list of 82 regional birding sites, and a bibliography of 130 citations.< Less