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Privy on the Porch & Pigs in the Cellar Part Three By Martha DeWolf
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Privy on the Porch & Pigs in the Cellar Part Three follows the extended Bullard family from 1836 - 1849, encompassing not only farm life in eastern Massachusetts but also an eyewitness account of... More > the Creek Trail of Tears in Alabama, as well as love letters between Thomas Westbrook Waldron, first U. S. Consul to Hong Kong and the woman he never married, Frances Sargent.< Less
Privy on the Porch & Pigs in the Cellar Part Two By Martha DeWolf
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In the early part of the nineteenth century, nothing much moved faster than the old horse could trot through the village. For generations, the family had measured the days by the passing seasons and... More > the years by the size of the harvest but the pace of life in rural New England had begun to accelerate. Even the concept of time was changing; what had been measured by the sun and the seasons would, during the nineteenth century, come to be measured by the factory bell and later, by the arrival or departure of a train. Part Two - 1830-1839.< Less
Privy on the Porch & Pigs in the Cellar Part Three By Martha DeWolf
eBook (ePub): $3.99
Download immediately.
Privy on the Porch & Pigs in the Cellar Part Three follows the extended Bullard family from 1836 - 1849, encompassing not only farm life in eastern Massachusetts but also an eyewitness account of... More > the Creek Trail of Tears in Alabama, as well as love letters between Thomas Westbrook Waldron, first U. S. Consul to Hong Kong and the woman he never married, Frances Sargent.< Less
Privy on the Porch & Pigs in the Cellar Part Four By Martha DeWolf
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In 1850, the Bullard’s farm in Holliston belonged jointly to Henry and his younger brother John Anson; called Anson to distinguish him from a half-dozen or more other John Bullards inhabiting... More > the area then. At mid-century, Henry and and his wife Bethia had four children under the age of eleven and a busy household which included “old people, children, menservants, women-servants, and frequent guests”. Prior to the coming of the railroad to Holliston it had taken Henry seven hours by wagon (in good weather) to reach Quincy Market, twenty-five miles away in Boston. He often left Holliston late, the night before, in order to reach the market early in the morning. During the 1840's Henry and his brother Anson had foreseen the market advantages the railroad would bring and Henry had expanded the farm orchard, expanded the livestock and dairy herds and the brothers had invested heavily in the railroads and real estate. By mid-century, Henry began to consider life as a gentleman farmer.< Less