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Listening to the Voices of the Past, Reader (2013 Edition) By William Walter
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When used in tandem with a study of English history, this reader will encourage the student to observe the influences of history upon literature and to recognize the importance of having a basic... More > knowledge of history in understanding the content of many classic works. It is also hoped that the literature presented in this chronological survey will serve as a sort of window in which to view the people and cultures of England’s past. The text is divided into six sections from the Briton to Victorian period—from the landing of Julius Caesar on the English isle to the time in which the English Empire reached its height. These divisions were made roughly to match the changes in the style, types, and tastes of literature, changes in the English language, and changes in control of state. The selections in this reader are accompanied by a companion study guide that exercises the student’s knowledge or skills in vocabulary, reading comprehension, and poetics.< Less
A Journey's Start, Study Guide (2013 Edition) By William Walter
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A Journey's Start Study Guide contains exercises in vocabulary, literary terms, reading comprehension, poetics, and writing. The companion reader is available at... More > http://www.lulu.com/content/paperback-book/a-journeys-start/11008068. An answer key is forthcoming.< Less
Giving an Account, Study Guide (2013 Edition) By William Walter
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What missed opportunities are there for teachers who do not recognize the personal narrative’s natural advantages over fiction! If you understand fiction at all, you understand that it is its... More > realistic, not fantastical, elements that make it so appealing. Fictional plots, settings, and characters have to seem real to the reader in order for them to be interesting—plots have to make sense, descriptions of settings must seem familiar, and characters’ thoughts must, at least vaguely, mirror our own thoughts. But even with the best fiction writers, the imagination sometimes can produce false fabrications. Personal narratives, such as those studied in this book, are for the most part not fabrications, but represent the real thoughts, feelings, and situations of real people. This study guide covers material not found in the reader, specifically Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar and Porchat’s Three Months Under the Snow. Note that the study guide takes a Christian perspective. An answer key is forthcoming.< Less
Giving an Account, Reader (2013 Edition) By William Walter
Paperback: $29.95
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What missed opportunities are there for teachers who do not recognize the personal narrative’s natural advantages over fiction! If you understand fiction at all, you understand that it is its... More > realistic, not fantastical, elements that make it so appealing. Fictional plots, settings, and characters have to seem real to the reader in order for them to be interesting—plots have to make sense, descriptions of settings must seem familiar, and characters’ thoughts must, at least vaguely, mirror our own thoughts. But even with the best fiction writers, the imagination sometimes can produce false fabrications. Personal narratives, such as those found in this textbook, are for the most part not fabrications, but represent the real thoughts, feelings, and situations of real people. The text will include works by Plutarch, Lewis and Clark, George Müller, James Boswell, Booker T. Washington, Charles Dickens and others. An accompanying study guide is available separately.< Less