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  • By phil.hermetic
    Apr 1, 2010
    By Phil Whitley phil.hermeticlangtoft.net When you go to see a mill engine being run at a Steam weekend, or you see one in a museum, like the magnificent example in foyer of the the Science Museum in London, it is all to easy to imagine that what you are looking at is a wonderful example of original Victorian engineering. In reality however these ingenious machines needed daily attention, and sometimes suffered very major mechanical breakdowns, and needed replacement parts which were not available off the shelf, and were often of huge dimensions. This book is the story of the men who maintained those engines, who repaired them when they broke down, and who modified them to make them more efficient, very often using machine tools of their own design and manufacture, sometimes using no more than simple hand tools like hammers, chisels and files! Not only a cracking read, with many excellent photos, this book provides a "horses mouth" account of how it was done, and records... More > forever the information that will be needed in the future to repair and maintain these beautiful machines. Phil W.< Less
  • By john.a.ditchfield
    Oct 15, 2009
    "'Brown and Pickles' by Stanley Graham" 'Brown & Pickles' is not only a highly enjoyable and entertaining read, it’s a most valuable record of lost skills and of the area’s social and industrial history. The key figure in the book is the late Mr Newton Pickles, a millwright and engineer, and the author had spent many hours talking about his experiences and recording interviews. Some of interviews have been transcribed for the book, and Mr Graham provides explanations where technical language or obscure dialect terms are used. A couple of extracts: Stanley Graham is describing how the young Newton Pickles was sent by his father to install a large new bearing at a water mill, the bronze bearing having been made in Brown & Pickles' works. ‘Newton asked how they were going to get there and Johnny said they had to catch the bus! Now this bearing weighed about 100 kg (200 lbs) so these two lads set off with it on a bogie, manhandled it onto the bus, and then dragged it... More > down through the fields from the top road to County Brook in a foot of snow. I think it was Johnny’s idea of initiative training.’ An extract in Newton's words, describing how they tackled an urgent repair at a cotton mill, where a large engine shaft weighing several tons had failed, and a new one had to be made, starting with a steel forging. 'I fetched the forging from Webb's at Bury and it were red hot, it were sizzling, they put it on some steel girders for me at Webb's, fastened it on wi' some chains and I brought it red hot and it were drizzling wi' rain. I'll bet everybody thowt the wagon were on fire when I were coming through Burnley, all steaming up. ...... We got it in't lathe and got it on top of the bed but it were too hot to begin turning'. He goes on to describe the processes involved in the rest of the repair. Fascinating for engineers, and I'm sure that it will prove to be an interesting eye-opener for non-technically minded readers, too. In an era when there’s always a job’sworth around to pop up with a reason why something can’t be done, it’s refreshing to read about people of our parents' or grandparents' generation, who just did it.< Less
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Product Details

ISBN
9781409264842
Published
February 26, 2009
Language
English
Pages
364
Binding
Perfect-bound Paperback
Interior Ink
Black & white
Weight
1.34 lbs.
Dimensions (inches)
6 wide x 9 tall
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