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In a London Fog By Elizabeth R. Lawrence
eBook (PDF): $9.95
Perhaps if they were less sensitive, less romantic, less tuned in to each other, less mature, or even more experienced it would have been easier. He couldn’t afford to lose anything. He had... More > nothing. Less than nothing. But it made up his world. He was an innocent, even in the murky world around him, a good and decent man without guile who played cops and robbers for a living. Was it that or his sex appeal that stopped her in her tracks? Was it that combination? She didn’t know, and she didn’t know what he’d do if she just turned away but she didn’t want to hurt him or see him hurt himself for her sake. Nor did she want to be hurt. “…But women’s ways are witless ways…”< Less
Swimming With Sharks By Elizabeth R. Lawrence
eBook (PDF): $6.50
Swimming with Sharks is an allegorical title to tell a story in which characters and events symbolize the deeper, underlying meaning. This is not a fish tale. It is an adult story about sales and... More > those who practice it today much like the drummer man of old. Among them is a satyr defined as a grossly lustful man.. In Greek and Roman mythology it is a man in human form but having a goat's ears, tail and legs. The dolphin reflects playfulness, innocence and love.< Less
Nobody's Children By Elizabeth R Lawrence
eBook (PDF): $9.95
(1 Ratings)
The orphan trains stopped running in 1929 and the foster care system began. Hollywood relieved Depression era problems on the subject with films starring Shirley Temple. "Room for One... More > More" with Cary Grant depicted the need for foster families. "Blossoms In the Dust" starring Greer Garson dealt with the social stigma faced by both the parents and the children. Having immigrant parents in the mix added more problems. This was my family. We were a family torn apart as our parents fought to regain their children while the system held them hostage to the moral tenor of the times. Once the State took us a promise was made, a promise believed. Why, in the end, did we then feel twice abandoned, twice betrayed?< Less
Swimming With Sharks By Elizabeth R. Lawrence
Paperback: $24.50
Prints in 3-5 business days
Swimming with Sharks is an allegorical title to tell a story in which characters and events symbolize the deeper, underlying meaning. This is not a fish tale. It is an adult story about sales and... More > those who practice it today much like the drummer man of old. Among them is a satyr defined as a grossly lustful man.. In Greek and Roman mythology it is a man in human form but having a goat's ears, tail and legs. The dolphin reflects playfulness, innocence and love.< Less
In a London Fog By Elizabeth R. Lawrence
Paperback: $24.95
Prints in 3-5 business days
Perhaps if they were less sensitive, less romantic, less tuned in to each other, less mature, or even more experienced it would have been easier. He couldn’t afford to lose anything. He had... More > nothing. Less than nothing. But it made up his world. He was an innocent, even in the murky world around him, a good and decent man without guile who played cops and robbers for a living. Was it that or his sex appeal that stopped her in her tracks? Was it that combination? She didn’t know, and she didn’t know what he’d do if she just turned away but she didn’t want to hurt him or see him hurt himself for her sake. Nor did she want to be hurt. “…But women’s ways are witless ways…”< Less
Nobody's Children By Elizabeth R Lawrence
Paperback: $24.95
Prints in 3-5 business days
(1 Ratings)
The orphan trains stopped running in 1929 and the foster care system began. Hollywood relieved Depression era problems on the subject with films starring Shirley Temple. "Room for One... More > More" with Cary Grant depicted the need for foster families. "Blossoms In the Dust" starring Greer Garson dealt with the social stigma faced by both the parents and the children. Having immigrant parents in the mix added more problems. This was my family. We were a family torn apart as our parents fought to regain their children while the system held them hostage to the moral tenor of the times. Once the State took us a promise was made, a promise believed. Why, in the end, did we then feel twice abandoned, twice betrayed?< Less