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  • By Tizer
    Sep 13, 2009
    "Barnoldswick: Short History of a Pennine Town by S. Graham" This history of Barnoldswick has just been published, written by Stanley Graham. I've bought and received my copy from Lulu (very quick delivery) and I'm impressed with the quality of the paperback book. Of course, I haven't had time to read it yet but I can see that it lives up to Stanley Graham's reputation as an excellent, readable writer who really does "know his stuff". He has the rare combination of academic qualification in history and hands-on experience with the mills, engines, factories etc of northern England. Although primarily a history of this Pennine town, the book will soon be recognized as essential reading for all people interested in the social and industrial history of Britain, and especially of northern England. Even if you feel you are not particularly interested in the subject I guarantee you will still enjoy reading the book - and you certainly will be interested afterwards!
  • By chris_aspin
    Aug 24, 2009
    "Barnoldswick by Stanley Graham" Stanley Graham's story of Barnoldswick, the former mill town near the Lancashire-Yorkshire border, is local history at its most entertaining and informative. There isn't a dull page. Stanley has lived in the town for half a century and has gathered a mass of material on all aspects of local life. He places his material deftly into a national (and, when needed) an international context, thus illuminating incidents that would otherwise seem obscure. Stanley infectious enthusiasm makes his book a pleasure to read. The only thing I missed was an account of the ways in which Barlickers spent their (admittedly limited) leisure. Perhaps that will make a volume in itself. Chris Aspin
  • By Stanley Graham
    Dec 3, 2008
    "Barnoldswick" Barnoldswick - The Story of a Pennine Town does exactly what it says on the tin. Within the covers of this new publication by Stanley Graham we find as near a ‘total history' of Barnoldswick as it is reasonably possible to get. Anyone who has ever attempted to write a protracted local history will know that the problem is very often what to leave out, rather than what to include, and Stanley has cracked this puzzle in his usual forthright, jargon-free style. The approach to the early settlers of Barnoldswick is sympathetic in as much as Stanley recognises the skills required of these people in their survival within, and their manipulation of a hostile environment. Throughout the text Stanley's admiration for those who have gone before, those who have shaped and built our towns and villages, is apparent, even when it might fly in the face of recognised (and in my opinion wrong) authority. The long-ranging history of Barnoldswick within this new publication is... More > of an excellent pedigree and, in the manner of all good local historians, Stanley relates the national and global picture of any particular era to his local subject - the micro is the child of the macro. In other words, we make sense of our world through an accurate knowledge of the past. As the text progresses through the long time-line from pre-history to the coming of powered industry Stanley treads firm historical ground. He has a wide knowledge of his subject and his writing style delivers that knowledge in a non-academic manner although we still reap the benefits of academic learning. Barnoldswick - The Story of a Pennine Town is no lightweight history; it is not a book to flick through in search of instant gratification. It is impossible to accurately write the detail of any era without the reader having need to involve themselves but in this case we have an offering of good, soundly-researched history presented in as readable a manner as possible. At 333 pages within 53 chapters this is a meaty first offering in book form for Stanley and he succeeds admirably. I like the idea of the ‘interlude' where the reader is provided with the literary equivalent of a tea break, the one relating to exploding pigeons caught my imagination in particular. The more technically astute might pick up on the odd technical lapse within the hard copy of the publication but this is minor detail that can soon be ironed out. Others might like to see more images but it has to be understood that printing costs very often dictate that images are added at the expense of valuable text - otherwise a book becomes unwieldy and prohibitively expensive. My advice, then, to all who have even a passing interest in local, national and, of course, Barnoldswick history is to buy Stanley's book. This is history with a passion, Stanley's love for his home town shines through the text - the book is good value and there is little doubt that it will occupy the pinnacle of writings on the Barnoldswick area for a long time to come. John Clayton. 02/12/2008 4:53:45 PM< Less
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Product Details

November 21, 2008
Perfect-bound Paperback
Interior Ink
Black & white
1.26 lbs.
Dimensions (inches)
6 wide x 9 tall
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