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Cowbellion By Ann Pond
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Cowbellion explores the origins of America’s Mardi Gras traditions, beginning with the "Cowbellion" Society, the first mystic parading organization. Following the Krafft family from... More > Pennsylvania to New Orleans and Mobile, Cowbellion explores the origins of America's Mardi Gras tradition and the world of slave traders and cotton merchants in Antebellum America. .< Less
Cain: His Lost Cause Generation and the American Mardi Gras By Ann Pond
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"CAIN" portrays the life of the real "Joe Cain." Mythologized for his role in "reviving" Mardi Gras in Mobile, Alabama after the Civil War, "CAIN" explains for... More > the first time who the real man was and how he inspired the people of his generation and those to come.< Less
CAIN and America's First Mardi Gras Paperback By Ann Pond
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Two days before Mardi Gras each year in Mobile, Alabama is “Joe Cain Day,” honoring the man who was once called the “Father of Mardi Gras.” There are many myths surrounding... More > his life, but this is the story of the real Joe Cain and the world in which he lived before, during and after the Civil War.< Less
Masons & Mardi Gras : The Secret Origins of The Mystic Krewes By Ann Pond
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Masons and Mardi Gras reveals how the mysterious rituals and symbols of the Freemasons transformed Mardi Gras into an American festival. The first secretive parading fraternity in... More > America was formed in Mobile, Alabama with parades on New Year's Eve. In New Orleans the Krewe of Comus took from Mobile the combination of the ritual-oriented fraternity with the "mystic" parade and they presented it on Fat Tuesday, or “Mardi Gras.” The parades of New Orleans and Mobile were acclaimed for their opulence and extravagance. It was a form of public entertainment that overwhelmed the senses like no other at the time. But it was not the Mardi Gras that the Creoles of New Orleans were accustomed to. As Yankee cotton brokers flooded into the ports of the Deep South in the early 1800’s, the traditions they brought with them became the new American Mardi Gras.< Less